Many of us would love to have a solar-powered home, but the upfront cost of buying and installing solar panels is prohibitive. Now, it seems that the business model for solar is finally catching up with the technology: companies are starting to lease solar panels. You can put $0 down and have panels installed and serviced for years, and according to Solar City executives, you can see immediate savings on your utility bills even when you factor in the cost of leasing. So if you're a ...
I used to think of flamingos as being tropical birds who only enjoyed African lakes and coral islands in deep blue seas -- but no more. [caption id="attachment_3375" align="aligncenter" width="300" caption="African flamingos in soda lake"][/caption] It seems that some of these iconic pink birds have been trying to reach more northerly climes as described in an amazing story on NPR recently. Reports of flamingos found near the eastern Siberia city of Irkutsk seemed like a thing of ...
  • 10 March 2011
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NASA and JPL have just released a study in Geophysical Research Letters based on 20 years of satellite data from the ice sheets of Greenland and Antarctica. The melting of the land-based ice masses is not abating but actually happening faster than previous melt models had predicted. It's even accelerating with each satellite measurement. This is hardly good news if you live near any low-lying coastlines in Florida, the Gulf Coast, Holland, or Bangledesh, just to name a few coastal ...
  • 10 March 2011
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A fellow at the Property and Environmental Research Center in Bozeman, Montana, pushes the idea of letting the public bid on oil and gas leases. This would create more competition and create a fair price to pay for drilling, one that includes some externalities. And it would have kept Tim DeChristopher out of jail. The story first appeared here. It goes like this: ... open lease auctions have the potential to reduce much of the acrimony surrounding energy leasing on public lands. It ...

By Greg Greene Documentary filmmaker Back in 2003, when Barry Silverthorn and I were making "The End of Suburbia," we were focused on the consequences of the coming peak oil crisis on the cities of North America. It was the world’s first documentary on peak oil; the theory that world oil production follows a bell curve, and we are on the top, or peak, of that curve. Peaking would mean that the world demand for oil would outstrip the available supply, resulting in rising food and fuel ...

When I was a kid growing up in LA, I read heaps of science fiction literature before studying environmental science in college and then going into business. I couldn't get enough of writers like Isaac Asimov, Robert Heinlein, Arthur C. Clarke, Philip K. Dick, and so many others. The 1950s are now considered the "golden era" of the genre, but I would have read their stories no matter what. The worlds they conjured excited me to no end, and they still entice readers, filmmakers and scientists ...
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