Coronal mass ejections from the Sun.

Auroras are usually viewed by looking up at the night sky. This fall view of auroras from northern Canada is a good example: [caption id="attachment_7749" align="aligncenter" width="900" caption="Septermber aurora's, Yellowknife, Canada (credit: NASA)"][/caption] However, if you thought such spectacular aurora borealis displays were only visible from the ground, check this out: Arouras from space What a spectacular viewpoint. WHB

  • 23 September 2011
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The European Space Organization announced the new discovery of 50 more extra solar planets including one planet within the temperate zone of its star. The planet could potentially support life but nothing quite like we know it. [caption id="attachment_7484" align="aligncenter" width="825" caption="Exoplanet within habitable zone (credit: concept image)"][/caption] The newly exoplanet is designated as HD-85512b, weighs in at nearly 4 times the mass of Earth, is estimated to be hot and ...
  • 13 September 2011
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The Milky Way and the Andromeda Galaxy are on a collision course. Andromeda --the only galaxy that can be seen with the naked eye --is on a course to collide with us billions of years from now. If you ever wondered what colliding galaxies might look like, check out this Hubble photo: [caption id="attachment_7086" align="aligncenter" width="575" caption="Colliding galaxies (credit: NASA)"][/caption] WHB
  • 30 August 2011
  • Author: Hugh Bollinger
  • Number of views: 34
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De Beers is the world's largest producer and marketer of diamonds. Couples planning to get married typically come in contact with the Company. A planetary discovery has just been made that must have the diamond cutters at De Beers pulling out their star charts. Using the famous Parkes radio telescope in Australia. an exotic object has been discovered that seems to be made of pure diamond closely circling a pulsar. The new planet is super-dense, consists largely of molecular carbon and ...
  • 26 August 2011
  • Author: Hugh Bollinger
  • Number of views: 29
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It has always been puzzling why the Moon's face directed towards Earth and the one we never see are so totally different. One is mostly flat with craters while the other is mountainous. A new study published from research by USA and UK astronomers now proposes an answer. Early in its evolution-- maybe 4 billion years ago when the Moon was still forming from a collision between the Earth and a Mars size planet --a second, smaller rocky mass came together in a slow-motion splat to form the ...
  • 4 August 2011
  • Author: Hugh Bollinger
  • Number of views: 31
  • Comments: 0
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