Environmental activism is growing in China.

Riled Up has paid close attention to sharks with previous posts on their conservation situation and the massive overfishing of these top ocean predators to produce a status-symbol soup in China, Hong Kong, and Taiwan. The unsustainable demand in Asia poses the threat of extinction for these iconic marine creatures that have survived since the dinosaurs. It seems that many others around the world have been paying attention to their precarious situation also. Both the BBC and Public ...
  • 22 September 2011
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By Reilly Capps How much should a country spend on its military? And how much should it invest trying to power itself? China is answering that question one way. The U.S. is answering it another way. China is, of course, poorer than us. But their priorities are clearly tilted toward trying to power themselves. Even though their economy is smaller, the government invests more on developing clean tech than we do ($65 billion vs. $45 per year, according to one report. Another report ...
  • 22 May 2011
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By Reilly Capps [caption id="" align="alignleft" width="170" caption="Danish glasses "][/caption] The Danes have bad food, bad haircuts, high taxes and stupid square glasses. Now they're annoying me with their braggy, showy, environmental boasts. "We're leading in clean energy! We make a ton of money off it! We'll be 100 percent renewable by 2050!" Go stick your head in a windmill, you Viking turds. You got plenty.  Check out this Danish taunting: "Denmark is now one of the most ...
Reports of toxic toys, melamine milk, and tainted kitty food are regularly reported being produced in China by corrupt manufacturers. However, who would have thought that watermelons would be the next target? Even these tasty summer melons aren't immune from Chinese food contamination practices. China's state-owned television reports that farmers in Jiangsu Province have been pumping-up their melon fields with overdoses of a growth stimulation chemical called forchlorfenuron. This plant ...
Waist size, car size, TV size -- we got rich and everything got big. The average American house in 2004 was about two and a half times as big as the average house in 1950 (from 983 square feet to 2,349). That's not true all over. The Chinese, like most Asians, have stuffed many generations into the same small houses. But now that the Chinese are getting rich, it's likely they'll want to expand. But at least one architect has built a smarter (if extremely quirky) house in Hong Kong. Check ...
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